Snowdrops (Galanthus Nivalis)

The month of February is not renowned for the variety of flowers that we see through the summer months, but if you’re willing to look carefully, there are some beautiful booms and foliage’s out there to peak your interest.

One of my favourites has to be Snowdrops (Galanthus Nivalis) and while not native to the uk, they are a welcome indicator that Spring is edging closer. Often seen in swathes, carpeting woodland floors, they favour a damp soil and look fantastic en masse. Another wonderful way to enjoy them is indoors, bulbs can easily be transferred to ceramic or terracotta pots and are a welcome addition to any indoor space. 

Janne Ford, amazing floral photographer and stylist, kindly shared some of her stunning images of Snowdrops which she has captured beautifully in both settings and may inspire you to look at them a little differently.  

WITH WINTER WEDDINGS ON THE RISE,
SNOWDROPS CAN BE THE PERFECT OPTION
FOR A SEAONALLY INSPIRED TABLESCAPE.

Another flowery friend of mine, Cissy of Wild Stems and founder & lead instructor at The Sustainable School of Floristry was also kind enough to share these photos of a wedding she curated for her clients last January.

Cissy dug up developing Snowdrop bulbs, potted them into small terracotta pots to create this simple yet striking tablescape for her clients’ wedding. The combination of clean white linens, candle light and these dainty flowers is just so reflective of the season and what a wonderful way for the couple to be connected to nature, when the snowdrops flower each season.

To complete this cycle of season led floristry, Cissy replanted all the Snowdrops bulbs after the wedding, thereby rebalancing nature’s store cupboard and allowing them to flourish further.

So I do hope this has encouraged you to either plant more bulbs or perhaps allocate a small clump of Snowdrops that can be dug up each year to enjoy inside. Huge thanks to Janne & Cissy for sharing their beautiful images. Find them here:

JANNE FORD PHOTOGRAPHY – Header & first 5 images
WILD STEMS & THE SUSTAINABLE SCHOOL OF FLORISTRY – last 2 images

Hannah x